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 Grand Challenges in Global Health Program

The Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative fosters scientific and technological innovation to solve key health problems in the developing world. The initiative includes the Grand Challenges in Global Health grant program and the newer Grand Challenges Explorations grant program.

The Grand Challenges in Global Health grant program began in 2005 with the award of five-year grants totaling $458 million to scientists from 33 countries. Currently, Grand Challenges in Global Health grants target a set of 16 Grand Challenges.


Opportunity and Date

Showing Grants 1 to 10 of 10
Cell Wall Glycan Biomarkers for Tuberculosis
Primary Investigator:
Todd Lowary, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada - CA
Challenge:
Todd L. Lowary of the University of Alberta in Canada will develop a library of chemically synthesized glycans, which are antigens found on the cell wall of M. tuberculosis, and prepare a microarray of them to screen for antibodies that signal the presence of active TB.
Disposable Sampling Plate and Breath Test to Identify Patients with Active Tuberculosis
Primary Investigator:
James Graham, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States - US
Challenge:
James E. Graham, Xiao-An Fu, Michael H. Nantz, and Richard M. Higashi of the University of Louisville in the U.S. will investigate the use of adsorptive sample plates with chemically reactive coatings to capture, identify, and validate unique volatile organic compounds found in breath samples of TB patients. This approach can establish the basis for a simple point of care test to identify active disease.
Exosomes as Biomarkers for Tuberculosis
Primary Investigator:
Karen Dobos, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States - US
Challenge:
Karen Dobos of Colorado State University in the U.S., along with Jeff Schorey of the University of Notre Dame and their partners at the University of San Francisco, seek to identify and validate protein signatures on exosomes, which are small vesicles secreted by M. tuberculosis-infected host cells, for use as biomarkers to diagnose TB. These protein signatures seem to be concentrated by exosomes in such a way that they could be used as highly sensitive indicators of disease in diagnostic tests.
Modified DNA Aptamer Affinity Reagents for Mtb Biomarker Validation
Primary Investigator:
Dan Feldheim, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, United States - US
Challenge:
Dan Feldheim of the University of Colorado at Boulder in the U.S. and collaborators Bruce Eaton of the University of Colorado and Delphi Chatterjee of Colorado State University propose to develop new modified DNA aptamer affinity reagents for detecting urine biomarkers of M. tuberculosis active disease. These reagents could form the basis of low-cost, low-power diagnostic sensors for use in resource-limited settings.
Novel Reagents for the Serological Diagnosis of Tuberculosis
Primary Investigator:
David Anderson, Macfarlane Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Australia - AU
Challenge:
David Anderson of the Macfarlane Burnet Institute in Australia will examine a unique aspect of the host antibody response that may better differentiate current and past tuberculosis infections. If successful, this approach could be readily incorporated in simple, disposable blood test formats that are currently used for diagnosis in resource-poor settings.
Pathogen and Host Metabolites as Diagnostic Signatures of Tuberculosis
Primary Investigator:
John Belisle, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States - US
Challenge:
John Belisle of Colorado State University in the U.S. will assess the feasibility of using small molecules created by the metabolic processes of host or pathogen cells, as well as lipids and fatty acids produced by the TB bacterium, as biomarkers of active disease.
Permeable Magnetic Nanoparticles for Point-Of-Care TB Diagnosis
Primary Investigator:
David Alland, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States - US
Challenge:
David Alland of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in the U.S., in collaboration with Advantageous Systems (ADS), will develop a method that uses paramagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with capture antibodies to quickly extract M. tuberculosis bacteria from a patient’s sputum sample. This simple extraction method can be applied to a broad range of detection technologies, enabling rapid tuberculosis detection.
SOMAmer-based Detection of Tuberculosis Biomarkers
Primary Investigator:
Urs Ochsner, SomaLogic, Inc, Boulder, CO, United States - US
Challenge:
Urs Ochsner of SomaLogic, Inc. in the U.S. will lead a team to expand and test a library of SOMAmers (slow off-rate modified aptamers) to identify protein biomarkers that indicate active tuberculosis from a small sample of blood. SOMAmers, which are modified nucleic acid-based protein-binding agents, offer several advantages over the antibodies traditionally used in diagnostic tests including greater stability, lower cost, and no need for refrigeration.
Ultra-Sensitive Proteomic Quantitation of Circulating TB Biomarker Candidates by Complete Proteome SRM Assays
Primary Investigator:
Robert Moritz, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA, United States - US
Challenge:
Robert Moritz and colleagues at the Institute for Systems Biology and Seattle Biomed in the U.S. will use ultra-sensitive targeted assay technology to identify, quantify, and validate a library of biomarker candidates specific to both active and latent TB infection. Moritz and his team hope to discover highly specific proteins that could help determine disease status at the point of care and inform appropriate treatment.
Validation of the Diagnostic Utility of Mtb Protein Biomarkers Found in Urine of TB Patients
Primary Investigator:
Antonio Campos-Neto, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA, United States - US
Challenge:
Antonio Campos-Neto of The Forsyth Institute in the U.S. along with collaborators Nira Pollock of The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School and David Duffy of Quanterix Corporation, seek to validate seven M. tuberculosis proteins found in the urine of tuberculosis patients as biomarkers of active disease. The ultimate goal is to use the most promising markers to develop a non-invasive point-of-care test, which could be similar to a simple home-pregnancy test.

 THE GRAND CHALLENGES

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