Grand Challenges in Global Health Grants
 
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 Grand Challenges in Global Health Program

The Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative fosters scientific and technological innovation to solve key health problems in the developing world. The initiative includes the Grand Challenges in Global Health grant program and the newer Grand Challenges Explorations grant program.

The Grand Challenges in Global Health grant program began in 2005 with the award of five-year grants totaling $458 million to scientists from 33 countries. Currently, Grand Challenges in Global Health grants target a set of 16 Grand Challenges.


Opportunity and Date

Showing Grants 1 to 5 of 5
Balance of Th17 Cells and Regulatory T Cells in Candidal Vaginal Colonization in Pregnant Macaques and Humans
Primary Investigator:
Margaret Hostetter, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States - US
Challenge:
Margaret Hostetter from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in the U.S. and her co-investigators will examine how disruption of the normal bacteria and other micro-organisms (the microbiome) of the lower female genital tract may increase risk of preterm birth. These investigations will focus on vaginal Candida infections in pregnancy, inflammation, and regulation of the immune response. Research will be conducted using animal models and laboratory investigations connected to studies of women in low-resource countries. Their goal is to investigate protective and pathogenic mechanisms of preterm birth and identify novel treatment strategies for vaginal fungal infections to prevent preterm birth. Funding partners: Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Biomarkers and Interventions to Prevent Preterm Birth and Stillbirth Associated with Placental Malaria
Primary Investigator:
Kevin Kain, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada - CA
Challenge:
Kevin Kain of the University Health Network and the University of Toronto in Canada will investigate malaria infections of the placenta to reveal specific roles of the immune response that lead to preterm birth, low birth weight, and stillbirth. This project will focus on discovering biomarkers to identify at-risk pregnancies as well as new interventions to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. Funding partners: Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Development of Gene-Specific Progesterone Receptor Modulators to Prevent Preterm Birth
Primary Investigator:
Sam Mesiano, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States - US
Challenge:
Sam Mesiano of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in the U.S. and his team will investigate the body’s receptors for progestin-based therapies in pregnancy to identify ways to enhance anti-inflammatory processes in all pregnant women and prevent preterm birth. The long-term goal of this project is to develop an inexpensive oral therapy that will reduce the prevalence of preterm birth worldwide. Funding partners: Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Inflammatory Pathways to Preterm Birth
Primary Investigator:
David Olson, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada - CA
Challenge:
David Olson from the University of Alberta in Canada will work to better understand how infections can cause preterm birth. Using animal models and later in studies of women in low-income countries, he and his team will investigate multiple mediators of inflammation in the uterus early in pregnancy, as well as test new diagnostics and therapeutics that can identify women at risk, modulate the inflammatory response, and prolong pregnancy. Funding partners: Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Mechanisms of Intrauterine Group B Streptococcal Infections During Pregnancy
Primary Investigator:
David Aronoff, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States - US
Challenge:
David Aronoff of the University of Michigan in the U.S., with an interdisciplinary team of experts in microbiology, immunology, reproductive biology, and vaccine development, will examine how infections of the female reproductive tract interact with and evade the immune system, resulting in infections of the uterus that cause preterm birth and stillbirth. This work will research potential targets for prevention of invasive infections of the female genital tract, including plans to investigate strains of group B Streptococcus (GBS) from low-income countries for vaccine and drug development. Funding partners: Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 THE GRAND CHALLENGES

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